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ScienceDaily's AI News

ScienceDaily's AI News
Artificial Intelligence News. Everything on AI including futuristic robots with artificial intelligence, computer models of human intelligence and more.
Updated: 6 hours 16 min ago

Robot model for infant learning shows bodily posture may affect memory and learning

Wed, 18/03/2015 - 15:39
Using both robots and infants, a cognitive scientist and collaborators have found that posture is critical in the early stages of acquiring new knowledge. "This study shows that the body plays a role in early object name learning, and how toddlers use the body's position in space to connect ideas," an author said. "The creation of a robot model for infant learning has far-reaching implications for how the brains of young people work."

'Visual' Turing test developed

Wed, 11/03/2015 - 12:47
Computers are able to recognize objects in in photographs and other images, but how well can they 'understand' the relationships or implied activities between objects? Researchers have devised a 'visual Turing test' to evaluate how well computers perform at that task.

Bio-inspired eye stabilizes robot's flight

Tue, 10/03/2015 - 07:41
Biorobotics researchers have developed the first aerial robot able to fly over uneven terrain that is stabilized visually without an accelerometer. Called BeeRotor, it adjusts its speed and avoids obstacles thanks to optic flow sensors inspired by insect vision. It can fly along a tunnel with uneven, moving walls without measuring either speed or altitude.

Moves to automate identification of Saimaa ringed seals

Fri, 06/03/2015 - 07:37
Moves are being made to automate the identification of Saimaa ringed seals. This would bring new kinds of real-time information on how the extremely endangered species behaves, the movements of individual seals, and what happens to them. The final aim of an ongoing study on machine vision is to get a biometric passport for each individual Saimaa ringed seal. This happens on the basis of the unique fur patterns of each individual seal, using computer-based smart calculation and digital image processing. The aim is to store the information in a so-called Saimaa ringed seal database.

Kids and robots learn to write together

Wed, 04/03/2015 - 10:45
Who is the teacher: the student or the machine? By showing a robot how to write letters, children improve their writing skills and gain self-confidence.

Reading speed harnessed to automatically control text display rates

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 07:49
Reading a text is something that each of us does at our own individual pace. This simple fact has been exploited by computer scientists who have developed a software system that recognizes how fast a text on a display screen is being read and then allows the text to scroll forward line by line at the right speed. The technology makes use of commercially available eye-tracking glasses, which are able to capture the motion of the user’s eyes and convert this into a reading speed.

The better to see you with: Prosthetic leg would keep an eye on path ahead

Fri, 27/02/2015 - 18:10
A mechanical engineer and his team have developed a computer-controlled camera that enables their robotic ankle to see where it is going.

A picture is worth 1000 words, but how many emotions?

Fri, 06/02/2015 - 12:52
Researchers have come up with a more accurate way than currently possible to train computers to be able to digest data that comes in the form of images and extract the emotions they convey.

Human insights inspire solutions for household robots

Thu, 05/02/2015 - 14:12
People typically consider doing the laundry to be a boring chore. But laundry is far from boring for artificial intelligence researchers. To AI experts, programming a robot to do the laundry represents a challenging planning problem because current sensing and manipulation technology is not good enough to identify precisely the number of clothing pieces that are in a pile and the number that are picked up with each grasp. People can easily cope with this type of uncertainty and come up with a simple plan. But roboticists for decades have struggled to design an autonomous system able to do what we do so casually--clean our clothes.

Prototype of a robotic system with emotion and memory

Thu, 05/02/2015 - 14:11
Researchers have developed a prototype of a social robot which supports independent living for the elderly, working in partnership with their relatives or carers. 

Octopus robot makes waves with ultra-fast propulsion

Thu, 05/02/2015 - 08:30
Scientists have developed an octopus-like robot, which can zoom through water with ultra-fast propulsion and acceleration never before seen in human-made underwater vehicles. Most fast aquatic animals are sleek and slender to help them move easily through the water but cephalopods, such as the octopus, are capable of high-speed escapes by filling their bodies with water and then quickly expelling it to dart away. Inspired by this, scientists built a deformable octopus-like robot with a 3D printed skeleton with no moving parts and no energy storage device, other than a thin elastic outer hull.

Programming safety into self-driving cars: Better AI algorithms for semi-autonomous vehicles

Wed, 04/02/2015 - 11:19
For decades, researchers in artificial intelligence, or AI, worked on specialized problems, developing theoretical concepts and workable algorithms for various aspects of the field. Computer vision, planning and reasoning experts all struggled independently in areas that many thought would be easy to solve, but which proved incredibly difficult.

Artificially intelligent robot scientist 'Eve' could boost search for new drugs

Tue, 03/02/2015 - 20:44
Eve, an artificially intelligent 'robot scientist' could make drug discovery faster and much cheaper, say researchers writing in the Royal Society journal Interface. The team has demonstrated the success of the approach as Eve discovered that a compound shown to have anti-cancer properties might also be used in the fight against malaria.

Machine learning offers insights into evolution of monkey faces, researchers find

Tue, 03/02/2015 - 20:42
Computers are able to use monkey facial patterns not only to correctly identify species, but also distinguish individuals within species, a team of scientists has found. Their findings, which rely on computer algorithms to identify guenon monkeys, suggest that machine learning can be a tool in studying evolution and help to identify the factors that have led to facial differentiation in monkey evolution.

Complex environments push 'brain' evolution

Thu, 29/01/2015 - 16:08
Little animations trying to master a computer game are teaching neuroscience researchers how the brain evolves when faced with difficult tasks. Neuroscientists have programmed animated critters that they call 'animats.' The critters have a rudimentary neural system made of eight nodes: two sensors, two motors, and four internal computers that coordinate sensation, movement and memory.

Mental health monitoring through 'selfie' videos, social media tracking

Thu, 29/01/2015 - 09:44
An innovative approach to turn any computer or smartphone with a camera into a personal mental health monitoring device has been created by researchers. The computer program can analyze "selfie" videos recorded by a webcam as the person engages with social media, to extract a number of "clues," such as heart rate, blinking rate, eye pupil radius, and head movement rate.

A robot to help improve agriculture and wine production

Wed, 28/01/2015 - 11:37
Agricultural researchers and computer scientists are working on the development of an unmanned robot, equipped with non-invasive advanced sensors and artificial intelligence systems, which will help manage vineyards. This robot will provide reliable, fast and objective information on the state of the vineyards to grapegrowers, such as vegetative development, water status, production and grape composition.

Game theory explains social interactions of cancer cells

Wed, 28/01/2015 - 08:20
The interactions of cancer cells may be explained by using game theory. The Public Goods Game is part of game theory and is used in economics as a model to analyze the provision of common goods. There is an imbalance in the consumption of these goods between those that provide them and pay the production costs and those that do not pay but consume anyway -- a situation that is known in economics as the free rider problem. The researchers now applied this model to the cooperation between producing and non-producing members of a cancer cell population, in order to examine if the model is also applicable to biological processes, such as carcinogenesis.

NASA, Microsoft collaboration will allow scientists to 'work on Mars'

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 08:58
NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will enable scientists to work virtually on Mars using wearable technology called Microsoft HoloLens.

Optimizing optimization algorithms: Getting best results when approximating solutions to complex engineering problems

Wed, 21/01/2015 - 15:55
Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering. Among other things, they're used to evaluate design tradeoffs, to assess control systems, and to find patterns in data. Scientists have come up with a way to generate a sequence of simplified functions that guarantees the best approximation that the method can offer.

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